Tagged: windows xp

COAA PlanePlotter Review Part 2

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Now that everything is working (hopefully!), we can proceed to customising the display.

The majority of the aircraft symbols seen will be yellow, but various colours can be assigned and labels expanded or reduced to individual preference. Additional colours are also used – for example expiring aircraft are orange and Mlat white. You may also  catch an aircraft with blue concentric circles radiating from time to time – these aircraft are squawking ident usually as a result of a squawk change.

POLLY01 (F-16 J-632) squawking ident 3635
POLLY01 (F-16 J-632) squawking ident 3635

To change these parameters we need to open up Chart Options (menu or easier via the spanner symbol). Initially the options seem bewildering, however its all quite straightforward, nevertheless I’d recommend changing a few things at a time and re-checking the display to see if its appropriate to your needs.

I've complied a sort of time lapse graphic here that illustrates colour changes as RYR96YE climbs to altitude (note nose colour cyan). In addition the aircraft data labels show what you can do by adjusting the Label settings under Chart Options...
I’ve complied a sort of time lapse graphic here that illustrates colour changes as RYR96YE climbs to altitude (note nose colour cyan). In addition the aircraft data labels show what you can do by adjusting the Label settings under Chart Options…

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COAA PlanePlotter Review Part 1

Download PlanePlotter

At the heart of the PlanePlotter system is Mlat. Here a USAF E-3C (SHUCK80H) is being successfully Mlated (manually by me - the blue lines are hyper curves used during the process). Note also the KC-135R (QID81) and MC-130J (LEGIT41)
At the heart of the PlanePlotter system is Mlat. Here a USAF E-3C (SHUCK80H) is being successfully Mlated (manually by me – the blue lines are hyper curves used during the process). Note also the KC-135R (QID81) and MC-130J (LEGIT41)

PlanePlotter Version Reviewed: 6.4.1.0-6.4.1.2 (GS/MU rN)

As an aviation enthusiast of many a decade I can tell you that this sort of hobby evolves over the years. Back in the 1980’s the only tools I had were a pair of binoculars, a copy of Ian Allan’s abc Military Aircraft Markings, a note book and pencil. As time went on I added a 35mm SLR (remember those?) and a collection of high powered lenses. The 90’s saw the addition of my first scanner plus a spotting scope for good measure. I was pretty much sorted – not much got past me at my local airfield.

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SDR Software (Free Stuff!)

Check out the Realtek RTL2832U+R820T USB SDR at Amazon.co.uk

So you are in receipt of a shiny new Realtek RTL2832U+R820T SDR dongle and I understand the first thing you want to do is start decoding ADS-B, ACARS or some other exotic data format. Maybe you just want to listen in to some local comms? Well we really need to get some software loaded up.

There are two popular SDR tuning programs and both are freeware: SDR# (SDRSharp) and HDSDR. I’ve tried both, but highly recommend SDR# as its more user friendly – especially for newcomers so we’ll stick with that.

SDR# (SDRSharp)

There are numerous SDR# versions available (stable/nightly builds) and a degree of experimentation is required to get the program up and running. Installation worked flawlessly on one PC but was a total nightmare on another. Eventually I got it working on both (funnily identical Windows XP platforms!). SDR# requires .NET Framework to be installed prior to running and the problems I had installing SDR# on my laptop was because I had 4.5 installed and not 3.5. To be on the safe side I ended up installing .NET Framework versions 1.0, 2.0, 3.5 and 4.5 (overkill or what?!).

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Realtek RTL2832U+R820T USB SDR Review

Check out the Realtek RTL2832U+R820T USB SDR at Amazon.co.uk

RTL2832U+820T fired up
RTL2832U+820T fired up

Check out the NooElec RTL2832U+R820T USB SDR at Amazon.com

I had my first real taste of radio decoding back in the 90’s. Things were a little different then though. For starters you needed a scanner or HF radio (or both), a demodulator (from Pervisell), leads to connect the radio audio output to a computer soundcard and of course software (or just plain old DOS) and a PC to process everything. At the time I had a subscription to Shortwave Magazine (sadly no longer in print) and the decode section was a godsend.

Each decoding practice had different protocols and often things didn’t work out as planned. Many hours (or days) were spent tinkering with leads, interface settings (bloody COM ports!) and antenna locations. If you were unlucky the Windows blue screen of death would make an appearance every now and again!

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BaoFeng UV-5R/UV-5R+ Plus FM Transceiver Review Part 2

Buy a Baofeng UV-5R from Sain Store on Amazon.com

BaoFeng UV-5R (left) and UV-5R+ Plus (right)
BaoFeng UV-5R (left) and UV-5R+ Plus (right)

The BaoFeng UV-5 is a neatly engineered little radio. And it is little: 55mm (wide) x 150mm (L) x 27mm (D) approx (measured at widest/longest parts and with no antenna). The plastic moulding is good and belies the price tag.

Before we proceed to operating/programming, a quick tour of the unit is in order.

The tri-colour LED backlit dual frequency display sits above a small speaker that provides good clean audio. The mic aperture is positioned to the left of the speaker (viewed from the front) and just below the RX/TX LED and orange VFO/MR button. Same side and from the top is the Call button, PTT (Push To Talk) and MONI (monitor) button. On the right side is the combined SP (speaker) MIC (microphone) socket – accessed via an attached flexible plastic cover.

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